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Posts Tagged ‘I love Orvieto’

Sometimes it’s better to admit defeat—especially when it appears your opponents have the upper hand (and the youth and energy to outlast you.)

I could “go full postal” on these boys, but what would that accomplish, really? If my goal is to live harmoniously with others who share this little alley with me, then it’s time I wave the white flag of surrender and call a truce.

As I sit here on my stoop waiting for the owner of this lovely dirt bike to arrive, I wonder if he’ll be open to easing our hostility and strained relations too. I’m calling for an armistice: The end of our Vicolo Wars.

This is the final chapter in the continuing saga taking place in my little alley. (Read Vicolo Wars, Vicolo Wars: The Sequel and Vicolo World War III.)

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So, you think you have to forego your workouts when visiting Orvieto? Well, you’d be wrong. On top of lots of strolling, you can take a Zumba class with the great Oxana Voropinova at Persiede dance studio (along with ballet, jazz, etc). There’s also several yoga and pilates studios around town and the ‘the 2 Peppes’ (tennis pros) at Villa Mercede will hone your clay court tennis skills. Not sporty? Then take the ‘walks of all walks’ on the ‘Anello della Rupe”: An hour trek around the rock that will change your life! Read about it here. Orvieto is good for your health! Like! Share! Visit! 

 

#‎31daysofOrvieto‬ ‪#‎orvietoorbust‬ ‪#‎iloveorvieto‬ ‪#‎Orvieto‬ ‪#‎Italytravel‬ ‪#‎Italy‬

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Day #9 of “31 Days of Orvieto” features my favorite church in Orvieto, Chiesa di San Giovanale. Built in 1004 (out-dating the Duomo by almost 300 years), it’s located in the Medieval part of town with expansive views of the countryside. What attracts me to this treasure is its austere beauty…and it’s ancient and illustrious past – they say it was constructed atop an Etruscan temple dedicated to Jupiter – which only adds to the mystique. Do the giant iron “belts” hold the columns together? The recent renovation brings the frescoes to life – obscured for years by white lime used to disinfect the church during the ‘Black Plague’. Like! Share! Visit! 

View from the wall outside the Church of S. Giovanale

View from the wall outside the Church of S. Giovanale

#‎31daysofOrvieto‬ ‪#‎Orvietoorbust‬‪#‎Chiesasangiovanale‬ ‪#‎Iloveorvieto‬ ‪#‎Italytravel‬ 

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bolsena lake

Lago di Bolsena, that is. Just a 20-minute drive from Orvieto, this oval-shaped crater lake (with a quaint medieval village) was formed from a volcanic eruption 370,000 years ago. Geologist believe that a piece of the volcano was catapulted nearly 30 km and landed at the site that Orvieto was later built (hence the town’s nickname “la Rupe). Etruscans found the volcanic ‘tufo’ perfect for digging wells and caves…and the rest is history! Find out more about Orvieto and its surrounding sites when you visit! Like! Share! Visit!  

bolsena mom, andrew lynn

Bolsena town

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

#‎31daysofOrvieto‬‪#‎orvietoorbust‬ ‪#‎Orvieto‬ ‪#‎iloveorvieto‬ ‪#‎Italytravel‬

 

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curtain

When you walk up the Corso Cavour from the funicular station, you’ll find the neoclassical, 560-seat Teatro Mancinelli. It hosts international theatre companies, avant-garde, jazz, dance and music. But, it’s the Fracassini masterpiece – a painted curtain (completed in 40 days) depicting the 535 AD event when a Byzantine army drove the Goths from Orvieto – that will blow your socks off! Visit the theatre for a self-guided tour and then afterwards, have a coffee or ‘lo spritz’ at the beautiful Caffe Del Teatro Mancinelli.  Share! Like! Visit! 

 


mancinelli light

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‪#‎31daysofOrvieto‬ ‪#‎orvietoorbust‬ ‪#‎browsingitaly‬‪#‎iloveorvieto‬ ‪#‎teatromancinelli‬ ‪#‎Italytravel‬ ‪#‎Orvieto‬

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Did you know that: 1) 2,500ish year-old Orvieto sits on volcanic tufo cliffs; 2) The Pope(s) slept here; 3) There’s an underground city with as many as 1,200 Etruscan caves and wells; 4) It was sacked by Julius Caesar’s Rome in 280 BC; and 5) The famous funicular railway was once operated by a water-ballast counterbalanced system?

Want to find out more? Come! Visit and Share the “31 Days of Orvieto” with your friends!

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Day #3 of “31 Days of Orvieto” highlights the ARTISAN.

Our friend Steven Brenner of Cross-Pollinate & The-Beehive has made a film showcasing Orvietano (Roman by birth) Federico Badia, a young man who creates handmade shoes and other leather goods. The film asks the question: What is the future of Italy’s artisans? Let’s hope the answers is that there is a future for Federico and other’s like him in Orvieto and throughout the world! Share if you care about and support fine craftsmanship and a deep dedication to one’s work.  Like! Share! Visit!

 

 

 

 

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